Open Access

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Back to Guidelines - Step 1
Teach a scientist to be open and you feed science for a lifetime.
~ Anon ~

Publicly funded research should be permanently archived, immediately upon acceptance for publication, on the internet, without any financial or legal restrictions to the public.

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BEFORE OPEN ACCESS
Publication/Subscription fees that put enormous pressure on researcher and library budgets

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AFTER OPEN ACCESS
No publication/subscription fees which releases additional funds for researcher and library budgets

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What is wrong with science today?

Please watch the video below for a humorous explanation

What is Open Access?

Watch the introduction to open access video below

Please watch further introductory videos below:

Types of Open Access

Below are the generally accepted definitions of the types of open access. Also see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_access

GOLD

BORN OPEN - Articles are public at the moment of publication, without payment of any article processing fees by contributors, and are then permanently archived via an institutional repository.

GREEN

EMERGE OPEN - Articles that were previously published under an embargo or pay-wall or both, are then made public and permanently archived via an institutional repository.

FOOL'S GOLD

PAY TO PUBLISH - Articles are public at the moment of publication after payment of an article processing fee by contributors, and are then permanently archived via an institutional repository.

PLEASE SEE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predatory_open_access_publishing

Copyright

Click on the heading above.

History

Introduction

A subversive proposal written by Steven Harnard in 1994, precipitated later by the serials bundle crisis, led to the beginning of the open access movement and the creation of institutional research/subject repositories.

For a detailed timeline, please view: http://symplectic.co.uk/open-access-timeline

Journal Costs

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Policy Formulation

An open access policy is usually for the repository director to formulate in collaboration with the research offices and top institutional management.

The essential features of an effective Green OA mandate are the following.

(1) It must require deposit immediately upon acceptance for publication (not after an embargo).

(2) It must require deposit of the author's refereed, accepted final draft (not the publisher's PDF).

(3) It must require deposit in the author's institutional repository (not institution-externally).

(4) Immediate deposit must be made a prerequisite for future research performance evaluation.

(5) The authors institutional repository must implement the "copy-request feature", if embargoes are enabled.

(6) The immediate-deposit need not be immediate-open-access so long as the "copy-request feature" is implemented.

Good Open Access Policy Practices

Mandate Green Open Access

Designing successful open access and open data policies

Open Access Literature

UNESCO Books for Librarians

UNESCO Books for Researchers

Policies

http://www.eifl.net/news/open-access-policy-guidelines-and-checklists
https://www.jisc.ac.uk/blog/top-tips-for-developing-an-effective-open-access-policy-18-jul-2016

Database

http://roarmap.eprints.org

Research Councils

Funders

Global Research Council - Action Plan

ARC - Australia - Policy

CAS - China - Policy

ERC - Europe - Guidelines

EPSRC - UK - Policy

NSF - USA - Policy

Tri-Agency - Canada - Policy

NRF - South Africa - Statement

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Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Institutional

International

National

Conceptual Origins

Founding Open Access Statements

Advocacy

Citation Benefits

Also see: http://wiki.lib.sun.ac.za/index.php/SUNScholar/Electronic_Citation_Persistence and http://wiki.lib.sun.ac.za/index.php/SUNScholar/Web_Analytics

The Open Access Citation Advantage

Click on the heading above.

Also see: http://www.eigenfactor.org

Communities of Practice

Wenger, et al (2002) defines a Community of Practice (COP) as a group of people who share a common interest and who come together to fulfil both individual and group goals.

Current News

Berlin Conferences

Open Access Preparedness Checklist

Open Access Discussion

Open Access applied at Stellenbosch University

Open Access and Open Science

Graphics

Tweets/Blogs